Now as I like to provide my site visitors with the complete information about my items and why certain features are important, then when this comes to LNBs things start to get complex.

So to begin with lets start with the easy questions like "what is an LNB?" and "what does it do?".

That is easy enough to answer when the signal broadcast from the satellite (in this case between 10,700 and 12,750 MHz) may travel well through the Earth's atmosphere, but it just does not travel well down the coaxial cable to the receiver. For that reason the LNB is there to down-convert this high frequency signal into a lower frequency signal that does travel well down the coaxial cable to the receiver.

And that is why almost every satellite dish needs an LNB, where it first has to collect the signal reflected from the dish, then to down-convert this signal into the lower frequency range, where finally it has to transmit this signal down the coaxial cable to the receiver.

Simple enough you may think when stick on any LNB and the job will be done and you can watch your desired satellite.

This is where we enter the complex stage marked the low complexity level, when there are lots of different LNBs out there. And the problem here is that if you get the wrong one, then either it could be incompatible with your receiver, or it could not handle the satellite frequency range you desire.

During the early days of Sky Television those "standard" LNBs used to handle reception from the Astra 1A to 1C satellites, but when Astra 1D satellite came along offering yet more stations, then suddenly these Standard LNBs did not work too well in this new frequency range. For that reason a new breed of LNB was released called the Enhanced LNB, which now claimed support for Astra 1A to 1D reception, which naturally was perfectly fine for use with the Hotbird and other satellite reception as well.

Since that event was many years ago, then the frequency range used by satellites has continued to expand, where it now seems to have settled down to the current 10,700 to 12,750 MHz range. That is what most people now refer to as the KU Band, even if this frequency range covers other frequency ranges like the K Band.

And so to turn a long story into a much shorter one, then the LNB type used by nearly everyone today in order to cover this frequency range is now called the Universal LNB. For that reason, then that is the type of LNB that I supply on this page in several different flavours.

There is still more than this so called KU Band out there however, when for example satellite viewers in the United States should also well know of the equally misplaced name of the C Band. This frequency range happens to cover the 3,000 to 4,000 MHz region, which is an interesting less popular system usually involving very large dishes, large LNBs, and items with strange names like the Corotor.

I also hear that there is interesting happening up at the KA Band at around 30,000 MHz, but my point is that the KU Band is the place to be and where Universal LNBs are usually always the one to get.

Now I move into the medium complexity level, when I talk out how LNBs actually work.

The most important control of LNBs involves tone and voltage switching by the receiver, where to begin with voltage switching within the LNB is used to control polarity. What I mean is that within each frequency range used by stations it is that two different stations can be sent on the same frequency by having one single station sent horizontally and the other vertically (as in the case of Linear Polarity).

This is possible when a Universal LNB has two sets of probes within it, where one set is aligned horizontally and the other is aligned vertically. And that is why if you twist the LNB around on the dish, then first you will lose the signal on the polarity that you was watching, before you then pick up the signal on the other polarity.

Now since going outside and twisting around your LNB is a whole load of work just to swap between polarities, then that is why Universal LNBs support voltage switching. This is achieved by if the receiver outputs around 13 volts, then the LNB will return the Vertical polarity, where on the other hand the receiver supplies 18 volts, then so will the LNB return the Horizontal polarity.

Some rare satellites happen to use Circular Polarity instead of the mentioned Linear Polarity, where in this case the signal is sent either Left or Right handed instead of the usual Horizontal and Vertical. Although there is a whole lot to learn here, then all you need to know on this page is that LNBs supporting Linear Polarity can still receive Circular Polarity well enough.

As mentioned above there is also the area of Tone Switching, which the receiver activates by switching a 22 kHz signal on and off.

Why an LNB needs this second switching signal is due to the fact that the frequency range transmitted by satellites is twice a large as the frequency range used by the Universal LNB to send the signal down the coaxial cable to the receiver. The reason for this is that adding an ever larger frequency range support into the actual receivers was both difficult and costly, but where no doubt sending higher frequencies down the coaxial cable would not work as well as with the lower frequencies.

That is why it was easier to divide the larger satellite frequency range into two, where the 22 kHz Tone Signal can be used to request either of the lower or higher frequency ranges.

Within the LNB this is achieved by having two different L.Os (Local Oscillators), where the first is set at 9,750 MHz and the second is set at 10,600 MHz. So when no 22 kHz signal is sent the 9,750 MHz L.O is used, but when the 22 kHz signal is on then the 10,600 MHz L.O is used instead.

By checking above you will notice that I have not yet mentioned the exact frequency range that is used by the LNB in order to send the signal down the coaxial cable to the receiver. And the reason for this is that by using these known L.O frequencies, then we can now easily work out this frequency range together.

From the above we know that the common lowest frequency sent by the satellite is 10,700 MHz, where as this will be sent to the receiver using the 9,750 MHz L.O then the calculation is a simple one. So this 10,700 MHz down-converted by 9,750 MHz means that this signal will be sent to the receiver at 950 MHz.

We can do the same again for the highest satellite signal of 12,750 MHz, when this would be down-converted using the higher 10,600 MHz L.O, which means that the highest frequency signal would be sent to the receiver at 2150 MHz.

And so all receivers that support the Universal LNB has to support a tuning range of 950 to 2150 MHz (L Band) in order to receive the satellite frequency range of 10,700 to 12,750 MHz. However, lets not forget that Voltage and Tone switching is also a vital part of this Universal LNB control.

Now while the older type receivers made you have to manually set the Tuning Range, 22 kHz signal, and voltage supplied to the LNB, these days things are often done differently. So on modern receivers you just set the LNB type to begin with (to Universal), which then allows you to input the Satellite Frequency directly (the receiver works out the Tuning Frequency and 22 kHz Tone Signal use) and then the Polarity.

Just as well I guess, when users these days have to deal with digital values such as the Symbol Rate, PIDs and Forward Error Correction.

Now that you understand all that you need in order to know about how an LNB works, then so do we come to the high complexity stage.

Before I begin then I will explain why mentioning such complex information is required, when I do not usually start quoting scientific formulas to customers. And the reason for that all comes down to the aspect of the Noise Figure aspect, which people buying an LNB often consider important.

Unfortunately, this Noise Figure aspect is often given more attention then it deserves, which then goes and makes people overlook other important aspects in the process. And so in order for you to fully understand about the Noise Figure, then so do I need to get technical.

To begin with so that you know what I am talking about, then the Noise Figure like the 0.6dB mentioned below defines how much noise the LNB makes. And the reason why noise is an important factor is that when dealing with signal, then the more noise you have the worse the Signal Quality would be.

And so at first looks buying the LNB with the lowest noise figure is all import, but this is not so when there are many other factors to consider. So naturally to understand the true worth of each of these two LNBs then we need the following formula...

N = kTB.

This is where N is naturally the Noise level, k is the Boltzmann's Constant, T is the Noise Temperature of the System (at the head end), and finally B is the Bandwidth.

So from this you can see that the Bandwidth is the only aspect that you can control from the receiver, but what aspect is important here is the Noise Temperature, when naturally the final aspect is an unchangeable constant.

That is why when working out the worth of each LNB it is a lot easier to work in noise temperature, when then you can easily add together every aspect to come up with a noise temperature total.

The first thing we should do is to convert these dB noise figures back into temperatures...

0.3dB = 21k
0.6dB = 43.5k
1.8dB = 150k

So in the ideal world the 0.3dB LNB appears to offer a 100% improvement over the 0.6dB LNB, which had the ideal world existed, then this would have meant that the following dish sizes could be used in order to achieve the same signal quality level.

0.3dB = 67cm
0.6dB = 95cm
1.8dB = 2.1m

Unfortunately we do not live in the ideal world, which anyone can confirm by testing these LNBs on these dish sizes.

What I mean is that the LNB is only one of many components that makes temperature noise, when I can say that the trip through the Earth's atmosphere, the ground, the dish, the Sun, and even the wall corrupts (the head end of) this signal with noise. And that is the problem in the whole concept, when going below 1 dB in LNB noise figure offers ever reducing gain.

Now as I can say that the pre-LNB environment temperature noise on a well installed system would on average produce around 40k to 50k of temperature noise, which when we add this 50k to the above LNB temperature noise produces...

0.3dB = 71k
0.6dB = 93.5k
1.8dB = 200k

So as you can see the former 100% gain between the 0.3dB and 0.6dB LNBs has now been reduced to a much lower 24%, but also you can see that my old 1.8dB LNB is still not doing very well with a 214% increase over the 0.6dB LNB. And these new figures when turned into required dish sizes in order to get the same signal quality level makes...

0.3dB = 85cm
0.6dB = 95cm
1.8dB = 1.4m

And so I hope that you can finally see that the real difference between the 0.3dB and 0.6dB LNBs is just a small 10cm on this dish size scale. This means that if going for the next dish size up costs you less than the difference between the best value LNB and the LNB that provides the lowest noise figure then it makes sense to get the slighly larger dish.

However, even this is not the end of the story, when in the Signal / Noise (S/N) game there is also extra things to consider like interference and beamwidth. Also it is true to say that efficient signal collection plays an important part, which is where a well designed and well fitted LNB comes in.

Also it is true to say that as you only need a 12 dB Carrier to Noise (C/N) level in order to get a sparklie free picture then I am quite sure that almost no person reading this could even spot the difference between a 0.6dB and 0.3dB LNB. After all the main use for an LNB with a low noise figure is to pick very weak stations out of the background noise. This may go to produce a very crude watchable picture in analogue but this makes little sense in digital. After all when dealing with a weak signal with a digital receiver then the result won't be watchable.

At the end of the day, then it is a nice idea to improve the KU Band amplifier (the 1st active device in the LNB that the signal passes through), but these days that offers minimal returns when a well built LNB and good installation are often more important. What I mean is that a well tuned system with a 0.6dB LNB will always produce a better result then a 0.3dB system that is just slighlty out of focus. For example I can obtain about a 20% signal improvement just by carefully aligning the LNB's feedhorn to the optimum point of signal collection on the LNB arms at the front of my dish.

So if you do desire to spend extra money on getting the best LNB type around then just make sure that you do not neglect the signal optimization of the rest of your system. As if you do then your extra expense would have just been wasted.

Smart Titanium 0.2dB Single Output Universal LNB

Now this Smart Titanium Single Output Universal LNB (model TSX) is rated at an extremely low 0.2dB. This noise figure is as low as you can get at the current time, where this model's low price makes paying for such a high performance worth-while. And to show how good this LNB is then the Smart Titanium Edition LNB range has already won multiple satellite magazine awards.

As you can see from the photo this LNB is extremely small in size, where the flange (body) of this LNB is even smaller than the diameter of the feedhorn. This small size, and resulting light weight, means that this LNB can be attached to even the smallest dish.

As you can also see in the photo this LNB, like the rest of the Smart Titanium range, is pure white in colour. Well that is except for the detachable darker grey plug, which after inserting your coaxial cable through the hole, helps to waterproof your connection.

Should you desire to know how well this LNB works then my calculations show that this LNB will provide around 34% better reception over a 0.6db LNB. While this will help little with receiving strong stations, when you cannot get better than perfect, but this LNB will certainly help turn weak signals into something more usable.

Just don't blame me if you pick up aliens on it. ;-]

While I can certainly spend a long time telling you how great this LNB is but in this case I believe that it is best to see these results for yourself. In this respect I will let you test out this item on your own system for FREE! Just place an order like usual and if you are not completely happy with the results then just return this LNB (within 7 days in an undamaged condition) and I will refund your entire payment, including the used postage cost. So you will have nothing to loose, except maybe your old LNB to the dustbin.

The technical aspects for this LNB are...

Input Frequency: 10,700 to 11,700 MHz (low band)
11,700 to 12,750 MHz (high band)
Output Frequency: 950 to 1950 MHz (low band)
1100 to 2150 MHz (high band)
Noise Figure: 0.2dB (low/high band)
Collar Size: 40mm
Connection: F-Type
Current Consumption: 110mA (max)
Conversion Gain: 50 dB (min) / 58 dB (max)
Working Temperature: -40 to +60 degrees C

As you can see this LNB works fine all the way down to -40 degrees C. This means that it can be used in extremely cold locations like within the artic circle.

I am also pleased to say that this Smart Titanium Single Output Universal LNB comes with a 5 year manufacturer's warranty.

Ordering Code: SE02S
Gross Weight: 162g
Price:

Smart Titanium 0.2dB Twin Output Universal LNB

Now this Smart Titanium Twin Output Universal LNB (model TTX) is rated at an extremely low 0.2dB. This noise figure is as low as you can get at the current time, where this model's low price makes paying for such a high performance worth-while. And to show how good this LNB is then the Smart Titanium Edition LNB range has already won multiple satellite magazine awards.

This Twin Output LNB is just like having two Single LNBs working at once. In other words this LNB can support two receivers with no loss of performance due to this sharing. This means that you can say have one satellite receiver downstairs and another one upstairs with both systems being able to receive clear strong signals.

I am sure that having two systems will prove very useful when one of your family members is hogging the other system. Not to mention that you can watch that late night movie in bed if desired. You can also have one output for you and then one for your kids, or even have this second connection going to your satellite card in your computer.

From the photo on the left you can see that this LNB looks very much like the following Smart Titanium 0.2dB Quad and Quatro versions. That would be because all three models make use of the same cover, in order to reduce the production costs no doubt, but since this model only uses two of the possible four connections, then that is why the remaining two holes have been sealed over.

The technical aspects for this LNB are...

Input Frequency: 10,700 to 11,700 MHz (low band)
11,700 to 12,750 MHz (high band)
Output Frequency: 950 to 1950 MHz (low band)
1100 to 2150 MHz (high band)
Noise Figure: 0.2dB (low/high band)
Collar Size: 40mm
Connection: 2 x F-Type
Current Consumption: 200mA (max)
Conversion Gain: 50 dB (min) / 58 dB (max)
Working Temperature: -40 to +60 degrees C

I am also pleased to say that this Smart Titanium Twin Output Universal LNB comes with a 5 year manufacturer's warranty.

Ordering Code: SE02T
Gross Weight: 365g
Price:

Smart Titanium 0.2dB Quad Output Universal LNB

Now this Smart Titanium Quad Output Universal LNB (model TQSX) is rated at an extremely low 0.2dB. This noise figure is as low as you can get at the current time, where this model's low price makes paying for such a high performance worth-while. And to show how good this LNB is then the Smart Titanium Edition LNB range has already won multiple satellite magazine awards.

This Quad Output LNB is just like having four Single LNBs working at once. In other words this LNB can support up to four satellite receivers with no loss of performance due to this four-way sharing. This means that you can say have one satellite receiver downstairs, one upstairs, one for the kids, with the final connection to the satellite DVB-S2 HDTV card in your computer. And with all four systems receiving clear strong signals at this very low 0.2dB rating. Sounds good does it not?

So this is a good LNB choice for those people who want to wire up their location so that everyone can see the programming that they desire without having to fight for the remote control.

In the above photo you can see that this LNB is on the small side for a Quad Output LNB. I can also assure you that this LNB is on the thin side as well. This is good news for both prime focus dish owners, due to the LNB shadow, and small dish owners, due to the lighter weight.

The technical aspects for this LNB are...

Input Frequency: 10,700 to 11,700 MHz (low band)
11,700 to 12,750 MHz (high band)
Output Frequency: 950 to 1950 MHz (low band)
1100 to 2150 MHz (high band)
Noise Figure: 0.2dB (low/high band)
Collar Size: 40mm
Connection: 4 x F-Type
Current Consumption: 200mA (max)
Conversion Gain: 50 dB (min) / 58 dB (max)
Working Temperature: -40 to +60 degrees C

I am also pleased to say that this Smart Titanium Quad Output Universal LNB comes with a 5 year manufacturer's warranty.

Ordering Code: SE02QD
Gross Weight: 379g
Price:

Smart Titanium 0.2dB Quatro Output Universal LNB

Now this Smart Titanium Quatro Output Universal LNB (model TQX) is rated at an extremely low 0.2dB. This noise figure is as low as you can get at the current time, where this model's low price makes paying for such a high performance worth-while. And to show how good this LNB is then the Smart Titanium Edition LNB range has already won multiple satellite magazine awards.

Now you know how good it is then let me tell you what this special LNB is used for, when this LNB is ideally used in an SMATV system. And for these people who do not know what SMATV is, then this distribution system allows for an almost unlimited number of receivers to use this one single LNB.

How it achieves this task is that this LNB does not support any Tone or Voltage switching at all, when instead the four outputs on this LNB covers the four possible choices instead. And that happens to be Vertical Low Band, Horizontal Low Band, Vertical High Band, and finally Horizontal High Band.

Therefore all possible frequencies and polarities are passed to an SMATV Multiswitch down the required four coaxial cables. This Multiswitch then supplies the correct one of these four possible choices depending on the Tone and Voltage signal received from each receiver.

More interesting is that these days you can use 4 of these LNBs on a suitable Multiswitch to have your receivers receive the correct satellite using standard DiSEqC LNB control commands. Not to forget terrestrial reception. This can mean that any room in your location can receive hundreds or thousands of stations with no conflict between systems.

So this is the ideal LNB to use for the home owner who wishes a satellite receiver in every room, a shared neighbourhood dish system such as in a block of flats, all the way up to managers providing a satellite receiver in every Hotel room.

This LNB is quite a small size for a four output model. You can see in the photo how all four outputs are placed one behind the other, where this makes the LNB on the thinner side. Along with the shorter height that you can see in the photo then the footprint that it would leave on the dish is quite small. This is important, when large LNBs are known to block some of the satellite signal from reaching the dish.

The technical aspects for this LNB are...

Input Frequency: 10,700 to 11,700 MHz (low band)
11,700 to 12,750 MHz (high band)
Output Frequency: 950 to 1950 MHz (low band)
1100 to 2150 MHz (high band)
Outputs: 1: Vertical Low Band
2: Horizontal Low Band
3: Vertical High Band
4: Horizontal High Band
Noise Figure: 0.2dB (low/high band)
Collar Size: 40mm
Current Consumption: 200mA (max)
Conversion Gain: 50 dB (min) / 58 dB (max)
Working Temperature: -30 to +60 degrees C

I am also pleased to say that this Smart Titanium Quatro Output Universal LNB comes with a 5 year manufacturer's warranty.

And so in the end this LNB will prove most useful everywhere where more than four satellite receivers are needed to share the single dish.

Ordering Code: SE02QT
Gross Weight: 375g
Price:

Invacom 0.3dB Single Output Universal LNB

This Invacom SNH-031 0.3dB Universal LNB is ideal for those people who want one of the best LNBs around and still desire to obtain a good price. If this is the best value LNB on this page is somewhat more questionable, but the one thing that I am sure of is that this LNB connected to your system would make for one happy owner.

This LNB through testing has been found to offer just about the best reception around of all LNBs up to and including 0.3dB. Also since all the hardware is placed behind the LNB instead of below it, then this minimises the LNB's shadow on the dish, which normally causes a drop in signal strength.

Making use of this LNB is easy enough, when you just need to mount it on your dish arms, where you then connect a coaxial cable (CT100 or CT125 recommended) between this LNB and your receiver. Please note that time should be spent getting the LNB at the optimum angle and position during install, ideally with the help of a signal meter, when just connecting it up at random can lose you a lot of the available signal. To this aim the LNB comes with the skew angle displayed on the feedhorn, which will extra help with the install.

Also this LNB comes with a rain protection cover, which if fitted correctly avoids the need to use Self-Amalgamating tape. This cover should be slid over the coaxial cable, the coaxial cable should be connected to the socket as normal, then the cover should be slid over this connection to create a water-proof seal.

The technical aspects for this LNB are...

Input Frequency: 10,700 to 11,700 MHz (low band)
11,700 to 12,750 MHz (high band)
L.O Frequency (low band): 9,750 MHz (9.75 GHz)
L.O Frequency (high band): 10,600 MHz (10.6 GHz)
L.O Stability: +- 1 MHz Typical
(including setting, aging & temperature drift) +- 3 MHz Maximum
L.O Phaze Noise: -65 dBc/Hz @ 1 kHz (typ)
-95 dBc/Hz @ 10 kHz (typ)
-110 dBc/Hz @ 100 kHz (typ)
Output Frequency: 950 to 2150 MHz (low band)
950 to 2150 MHz (high band)
Noise Figure: 0.3dB Typical (low/high band)
Collar Size: 40mm
Gain: 50 - 60 dB
Gain Ripple: <+- 5dB (26 Mhz bandwidth)
<5dB Typical (Low/High Band)
Current Consumption: 105mA
Image Rejection: 40 dB (min)
Cross Pole Isolation: 25 dB (min)

So if you are looking for a great performance Universal LNB, at a great price for a 0.3dB LNB, then I can assure you that you are unlikely to find a better offer anywhere.

Note: The latest version of this LNB is now a light grey colour. I will scan and upload the new picture when I next have the time.

Ordering Code: LNB03S
Gross Weight: 426g
Price:

Invacom 0.3dB Single Output C120 Universal LNB

Anyone really into multi-satellite reception, and knows their business, will know that this Invacom SNF-031 0.3dB C120 Universal LNB is the one out of all these models to go for. Not due to this LNB's excellent performance, or this great design, but due to the fact that you have the honour and privilege of paying a lot more for the LNB model that is missing its feedhorn.

That is right they took the above SNH-031 model, removed the normally fixed feedhorn, where they now want to charge you a lot more for it. So apart from this LNB's flange (the main body of the LNB) you would need to buy the extra feedhorn to bolt back on to it, but of course people already using these C120 models would already have a suitable feedhorn from their old model.

This in my books would be labeled as insane, had not separating the feedhorn from the flange offered such great advantages, when what is important here is not simply reconnecting these two back together, but what you can fit between them while doing so. And anyone knowing their satellite reception would now be thinking along the lines of a polarizer, like the magnetic polarizer, often called a ferotor.

You could also be thinking about a depolarizer, but for now lets stick to the one huge advantage of this LNB type.

The key point about all this is that you would not need this LNB type had all the signals coming down from these satellites been straight and correctly aligned to your LNB's probes. As the truth of the matter is that the satellites are tilted by different amounts, where for example one of the French Telecom satellites is tilted by 27 degrees. That as many people would know would result in a huge loss of the available signal, but things are not usually that bad.

So when using a polarizer with this LNB type, then it will allow you to fine tune the skew in order to maximise your signal collection on a per satellite or per transponder basis. I have a C120 type LNB myself, along with a magnetic polarizer, where I would never consider ever using anything else. After all efficient signal collection is vastly more important than with the likes of the LNB's noise figure, when Universal LNBs demand accurate probe alignment, where the signal collection would fall off quickly if the signal angle is less than ideal.

If you plan to follow this setup, then make sure that your receiver supports your desired polarizer type, where a magnetic polarizer is the ideal in my view, but other polarizer types, like the mechanical polarizer, can also be used. By the way, these polarizers are normally used to provide polarity control for other LNB types not supporting the voltage switching of the Universal LNB, but as seen they are also very useful in solving the fixed probe weakness of the Universal LNB.

So the common fixed feedhorn LNBs are ideal if the LNB is fixed at the one satellite or used between common nearby satellite locations, but anyone really looking to maximise their signal collection should be thinking only about C120 equipment. The word C120 by the way defines the circular connector on such equipment, which means that you need to ask for C120 type feedhorn, polarizer, depolarizer and other such equipment to have it all bolt together.

There you go, one important fact that everyone dealing with multi-satellite reception should know, but what so few people do.

This LNB through testing has been found to offer just about the best reception around of all LNBs up to and including 0.3dB, where using this additional equipment to maximise signal collection, including a feedhorn better designed for your dish type, will go beyond the capabilities of all fixed feedhorn LNBs. Also since all the hardware of the flange is placed behind the LNB instead of below it, then this minimises the LNB's shadow on the dish, which normally causes a drop in signal strength.

Making use of this LNB is still easy enough, when you first of all bolt all your C120 devices together. Then just need to mount it on your dish arms, where you then connect a coaxial cable (CT100 or CT125 recommended) between this LNB and your receiver. If you plan to use a magnetic polarizer as well, then you will be needing an additional two wire cable in order to provide the power to the polarizer.

Please note that time should be spent getting the LNB at the optimum position and angle during install, ideally with the help of a signal meter. For the angle, then this should ideally be set to zero for power off on the polarizer if such a setup is used.

Also this LNB comes with a rain protection cover, which if fitted correctly avoids the need to use Self-Amalgamating tape on this connection. This cover should be slid over the coaxial cable, the coaxial cable should be connected to the socket as normal, then the cover should be slid over this connection to create a water-proof seal.

However, I would still recommend using Self-Amalgamating tape on these C120 connections, when bolted together of course. As these C120 connections never look totally water proof to me, where in the case of expensive equipment it is always better to be safe than sorry.

The technical aspects for this LNB are...

Input Frequency: 10,700 to 11,700 MHz (low band)
11,700 to 12,750 MHz (high band)
L.O Frequency (low band): 9,750 MHz (9.75 GHz)
L.O Frequency (high band): 10,600 MHz (10.6 GHz)
L.O Stability: +- 1 MHz Typical
(including setting, aging & temperature drift) +- 3 MHz Maximum
L.O Phaze Noise: -65 dBc/Hz @ 1 kHz (typ)
-95 dBc/Hz @ 10 kHz (typ)
-110 dBc/Hz @ 100 kHz (typ)
Output Frequency: 950 to 2150 MHz (low band)
950 to 2150 MHz (high band)
Noise Figure: 0.3dB Typical (low/high band)
Connector Type: C120, 18.5mm waveguide
Gain: 50 - 60 dB
Gain Ripple: <+- 5dB (26 Mhz bandwidth)
<5dB Typical (Low/High Band)
Current Consumption: 105mA
Image Rejection: 40 dB (min)
Cross Pole Isolation: 25 dB (min)

So if you are looking for a great performance Universal LNB, at a great price for a 0.3dB LNB, then I can assure you that you won't find a better offer anywhere.

Ordering Code: LNB03C
Gross Weight: 345g
Price:

Should you need a C120 type feedhorn for use with either the above LNB03C, or your own C120 type LNB, then here is a well built feedhorn that is suitable for use with offset dishes. This feedhorn also comes with a 42mm adapter collar.

Ordering Code: FEEDHO
Gross Weight: 185g
Price:

Should you desire a C120 feedhorn for a prime focus dish instead then please ask for an order quote.

Invacom 0.3dB Twin Output Universal LNB

Here is the Invacom TWH-031 0.3dB Twin Output Universal LNB, which means that this model is just like having two LNBs pointed at the same satellite location. So by making use of both of the F-Type sockets on this LNB you can connect up two receivers, thereby having both receivers sharing the same dish.

This will certainly prove useful if like myself you wish to have a satellite receiver both downstairs and upstairs, where of course family have now taken over your main equipment to watch boring programming on. Even if you do not have a second receiver yet, then you can just leave the protection cap on the second connector, using it like a single output LNB, until you are ready to add your second receiver.

And this LNB is exactly like two of the above single output models combined into the one unit, when performance of this LNB can only be described as excellent. After all this LNB through testing has been found to offer just about the best reception around of all LNBs up to and including 0.3dB. Also since all the hardware is placed behind the LNB instead of below it, then this minimises the LNB's shadow on the dish, which normally causes a drop in signal strength.

Making use of this LNB is easy enough, when you just need to mount it on your dish arms, where you then connect one or two coaxial cables (CT100 or CT125 recommended) between this LNB and your receiver(s). Please note that time should be spent getting the LNB at the optimum angle and position during install, ideally with the help of a signal meter, when just connecting it up at random can lose you a lot of the available signal. To this aim the LNB comes with the skew angle displayed on the feedhorn, which will extra help with the install.

Also this LNB comes with two rain protection covers, which if fitted correctly avoids the need to use Self-Amalgamating tape. These covers should be slid over each of the two coaxial cables, the coaxial cables should be connected to the sockets as normal, then these covers should be slid over these two connections to create a water-proof seal.

The technical aspects for this LNB are...

Input Frequency: 10,700 to 11,700 MHz (low band)
11,700 to 12,750 MHz (high band)
L.O Frequency (low band): 9,750 MHz (9.75 GHz)
L.O Frequency (high band): 10,600 MHz (10.6 GHz)
L.O Stability: +- 1 MHz Typical
(including setting, aging & temperature drift) +- 3 MHz Maximum
L.O Phaze Noise: -65 dBc/Hz @ 1 kHz (typ)
-95 dBc/Hz @ 10 kHz (typ)
-110 dBc/Hz @ 100 kHz (typ)
Output Frequency: 950 to 2150 MHz (low band)
950 to 2150 MHz (high band)
Noise Figure: 0.3dB Typical (low/high band)
Collar Size: 40mm
Gain: 50 - 60 dB
Gain Ripple: <+- 0.5dB (26 Mhz bandwidth)
<5dB Typical (Low/High Band)
Current Consumption: 170mA (one) / 200mA (both)
Image Rejection: 40 dB (min)
Cross Pole Isolation: 25 dB (min)

So if you are looking for a great performance Twin Output Universal LNB, at an unbeatable price for a twin output 0.3dB LNB, then I can assure you that you won't find a better offer anywhere.

Ordering Code: LNB03T
Gross Weight: 500g
Price:

MTI 0.3dB Single Output Universal LNB

This MTI 0.3db "Blue Line" Universal LNB (model number AP8-T2BL) is an excellent performance LNB that is suitable for use with both analogue and digital receivers.

Using this LNB is easy enough, when you just need to mount it on your dish and then connect a coaxial cable (CT100 or CT125 recommended) between this LNB and your receiver.

However do not overlook protecting the connection between the LNB and the coaxial cable with self-amalgamating tape (see below), when rain water getting into either the LNB or the coaxial cable will greatly reduce signal quality.

The technical aspects for this LNB are...

Input Frequency: 10,700 to 11,700 MHz (low band)
11,700 to 12,750 MHz (high band)
L.O Frequency (low band): 9,750 MHz (9.75 GHz)
L.O Frequency (high band): 10,600 MHz (10.6 GHz)
Output Frequency: 950 to 1950 MHz (low band)
1100 to 2150 MHz (high band)
Noise Figure: 0.3dB (low/high band)
Collar Size: 40mm
Operating Voltage: 10.5v to 14v DC (low band)
16v to 20v DC (high band)
Current Consumption: <100mA
Output VSWR: 2.0:1 (typical)
L.O Phaze Noise: -50 dBc/Hz @ 1 kHz (max)
-75 dBc/Hz @ 10 kHz (max)
-95 dBc/Hz @ 100 kHz (max)
Conversion Gain: 50 dB (typical)
Image Rejection: 45 dB (min)
Cross Pole Isolation: 20 dB (min) / 25 dB (typical)

I am also pleased to say that this MTI Univeral LNB comes with a 3 year manufacturer's warranty.

And so if you are looking for a great value, high performance Universal LNB, then here is my recommended model that will provide excellent reception performance.

Ordering Code: MTI03
Gross Weight: 272g
Price:

MTI 0.6dB Single Output Universal LNB

This MTI built Manhattan LNB rated at 0.6dB comes highly recommended for use with both Digital and Analogue Receivers, when some users and suppliers can confirm that this LNB type can often produce better quality results to many higher priced LNBs quoting lower noise figures of 0.3dB, 0.4dB and 0.5dB.

Using this LNB is easy enough, when you just need to mount it on your dish and then connect a coaxial cable (CT100 or CT125 recommended) between this LNB and your receiver.

However do not overlook protecting the connection between the LNB and the coaxial cable with self-amalgamating tape (see below), when rain water getting into either the LNB or the coaxial cable will greatly reduce signal quality.

The technical aspects for this LNB are...

Input Frequency: 10,700 to 11,700 MHz (low band)
11,700 to 12,750 MHz (high band)
L.O Frequency (low band): 9,750 MHz (9.75 GHz)
L.O Frequency (high band): 10,600 MHz (10.6 GHz)
Output Frequency: 950 to 1950 MHz (low band)
1100 to 2150 MHz (high band)
Noise Figure: 0.6dB (low/high band)
Collar Size: 40mm
Operating Voltage: 11.5v to 14v DC (low band)
16v to 19v DC (high band)
Current Consumption: 110mA (typical)
Output VSWR: 2.0:1 (typical)
L.O Phaze Noise: -50 dBc/Hz @ 1 kHz (max)
-75 dBc/Hz @ 10 kHz (max)
-95 dBc/Hz @ 100 kHz (max)
Conversion Gain: 55 dB (typical) / 60 dB (max)
Image Rejection: 45 dB (min)
Cross Pole Isolation: 20 dB (min) / 25 dB (typical)

And so if you are looking for a great value, high performance Universal LNB, then here is my recommended model that will provide excellent reception performance.

Ordering Code: MTI06
Gross Weight: 227g
Price:

Self-Amalgamating Tape

This reel of polyisobutylene based Self-Amalgamating tape is a long 10 meters in length, which is plenty enough to be a generous as you want in protecting outdoor connections from rain, snow, ice and worse.

For those people who have never used Self-Amalgamating tape before, then I happen to simply love this stuff.

Ideally used then it is a vital component in any new LNB installation, when not protecting the connection between the LNB connector and coaxial cable with this weather-proof tape will over time be the ruin of your system. As once water has got inside the cable, or worse the LNB, then the received signal will be degraded to an unwatchable point.

And since the only real solution to this problem is to totally replace the coaxial cable or LNB, then when installing a new LNB then you would have to be totally out of your mind to not protect this connection with Self-Amalgamating Tape.

I happen to know this water problem very well, when I had my first Sky system installed for me. Due to a less than ideal job by the satellite system installer, then in less than a year water damage meant that the LNB had to be replaced. Since it was under warranty, then the first time it was replaced for free, but guess who did not do a very good install job again, when the second one later died of water damage as well.

Fortunately after months of problems my brother saw that one shop was closing down, where they was chucking all their shop junk in a skip. Since that happened to include an entire 60cm dish complete with LNB, then a desire to have this item meant that with one hefty snap my brother brought home this new LNB complete with the end of the dish arm.

And since I still have that now obsolete LNB today, then that is why these days I install my own satellite systems.

I did have one further water problem however, when playing about and swapping around all my LNB equipment meant that at the end of all this I forgot to apply this tape. So after wondering why my voltage polarity switching was no longer working as it should, then after discovering this oversight I had to replace 10 meters worth of FT125 coaxial cable.

So as you can see installing outdoor connections like the one joining the coaxial cable to this dish really needs Self-Amalgamating Tape, when if you don't use it then you will only pay for this mistake later on. As I have already done all of three times.

Also since this is very useful tape, then I also use it to secure those damned BNC plus to my old Ethernet network cable, when they used to have a habit of falling off. And that is where this tape bonding into one rubbery bulk means that this problem is now no more. Not exactly cable in need of weather proofing, but this is the best tape that I have found to handle this extra job.

Using this tape is easy enough as I well know. When first of all you just remove the backing from the tape, where you then stretch the tape around the connection. And after a day or two this tape will bond to itself in order to make one solid lump, which also means that when it is time to remove it then you will need to use a knife.

Well that is what Self-Amalgamating Tape is all about, which sure makes me hope that you want to protect your satellite system as much as I do.

Ordering Code: SATAPE
Gross Weight: 113g
Price:

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