Please note that I now only sell blank cards or cards that are unmodified from their official state. This means please do not ask me for any other card types when these I do not supply.

As these smartcards have a hundred and one different possible applications then you are welcome to use them for whatever purpose you may desire as long as it is legal and does not infringe any other person's copyright. Such cards these days are now called 'hobby' cards and you can either make use of public firmware that can be downloaded from the Internet or to write your own firmware using freely available assemblers.

As to possible applications then a simple security application is just one option to restrict access to rooms or to computer equipment. Another would be using smartcard authorization for the EAP request identify to restrict network communication access under the IEEE 802.1x specification. As that is just two possible applications for these smartcards then my former customers will know that there are also many other possible applications.

Now before ordering any of these card types please make completely sure that you know exactly what type of smart card it is that it is that you require when no exchange or refund will be allowed if cards are returned in less than perfect condition. And as wafer cards can get usage marks very quickly then you have now been warned.

To answer the most common question I receive of what card type it is that you actually require then for most people that involves finding the public firmware for your desired application when once found this firmware will mention the card type it needs to be programmed into.

Please note that these smartcards come with shorter than normal 6 months warranty simply because it is quite possible to kill a smartcard through misuse or overuse. The general 'care for your smartcard' advice reads... Do not expose to direct sunlight or high temperatures, do not let them come into contact with water or cleaning fluids, do not bend and flex them, and most importantly do not remove and insert them unnecessarily.

These smartcards in the right hands can and have lasted for many years. This six month warranty I consider a reasonable to split between normal use and over use. Please also note that I will NEVER swap a faulty smartcard with a new replacement if the card in question shows heavy usage wear marks no matter how long you have had it. You can say that in such a case it is obvious to see how such a card died.

To make use of these cards you would require a card programmer where the best value smartcard programmers around can be found on my Programmers page.

Finally good luck in any planned project that you may have.

PIC16F628 + 24LC64 (or 24LC256) Emerald Wafer

PIC16F628
   Program Area: 3584 bytes,2048x14 words
   Data Ram: 224 bytes
   Max Freq: 20 Mhz
   I/O Ports: 15
   In-Circuit Serial Programming (ICSP)
   Power-on Reset (POR)
   Brown-out Detect (BOD)
   Watchdog Timer (WDT)
   Power-up Timer (PWRT)
   Oscillator Start-up Timer (OST)
   Code Protection.
   Power saving SLEEP mode.
   Selectable Oscillator options.

EMER2: 24LC64 8192 bytes storage
EMER4: 24LC256 32768 bytes storage

Click Here to see the complete specification for the PIC16F628.

Well here is the one card type that I personally helped to bring about.

To start this story off then I used to supply a popular PCB version where after time I decided that a wafer version would be better. Too bad that it took over a year waiting for problem after problem to be resolved before this wafer card type first came to be made.

These problems began with the PIC16F628 just not existing in wafer card format when I first wanted them made meaning that Microchip had to decide to make this type in wafer card format before production could start. Then due to Microchip not following their own product specification these programming incompatibility problems had to be resolved before the first oddly coloured test batch came about.

Since all these problems set production back by over a year then this allowed other modern card types, namely the Silver and Funcards, to get a large head start. Still right here in stock is the final user product of these Emerald cards which I can say are very well designed and function perfectly.

Apart from the fact that I personally called these the Emerald cards, despite my desire to use the reserved Green card name before it was stolen for another card type, then I have also specified the design of this card type.

The first aspect was the internal wiring specification where from the above diagram you can see that these use RB7 as the data line. Long ago I had to decide to go with either RB7 or RB6 where it was an easy choice to make use of the same wiring format as with the earlier PIC16C622 based cards.

Since the first production test batch made use of some very undesirable colouring, namely lime green on the back and a quick colour scrawl on the front, then I had that design much improved in this final production. That is why these cards now come with a very nice metallic Emerald colour. Too bad that my scans below certainly do not do this justice. Well they look not unlike Dorothy's Ruby Red slippers had she wore Emerald Green slippers instead.

The only aspect that I did not handle was the space based images on these cards. This was a surprise to me when previous cards made by this manufacturer used designs like with my SILVER card.

That explains the only minor issue with the EMER2 image where of course this Galileo space probe after it was launched on its way by the Space Shuttle Atlantis suffered a major problem. This problem was that the main high gain antenna did not open as it should have where you can see the correct position in the launch image on the EMER4 card and then the "did not happen" open position on the EMER2 card.

This is why the multi-billion dollar Galileo probe had to make use of its back-up low gain antenna where even with lots of data compression this slower data rate was a large setback.

I did point out this image problem to them at the time but they still used this image anyway. I did also say at the time that it would be better to use the Cassini (the Saturn probe) images instead when of course at this point in time Galileo is deceased and Cassini is currently in action.

Since that is this card's manufacturing history now well covered I will now explain this card's great abilities.

Compared to the humble Gold card this Emerald card type has twice the firmware storage, three times the on-chip eeprom storage, then to top it off the Emerald 2 card type comes with four times the external EEPROM size, while the Emerald 4 card comes with sixteen times the external EEPROM size.

Since these two Emerald card types sell at around Gold card prices then already these are much better cards for the same sort of price. Firmware authors would be crazy to make their firmware for the old Gold cards instead of for these new Emerald 2 & 4 card types instead.

Also for firmware authors who have used the PIC16C622 + 24LC64 OTP cards before, then since the PIC16F628 is in the same device family, then so can these Emerald cards use all this PIC16C622 firmware. In rare cases that this PIC16C622 firmware does not work straight away then just see the Microchip site for the small required changes. That is sure to prove interesting when unlike PIC16C622 based cards this Emerald PIC16F628 type is a "flash" model.

To finish this section off then if you wish your card dedicated to the memory to of one of NASA's little billion dollar space probes, which included such findings like a submerged ocean on Europa and the possibility of life there, then here are the cards that feature the Galileo space probe that unfortunately plunged to its death as planned in Jupiter's atmosphere on the 21st of September 2003.

<EMER2F>
<EMER2B>

Ordering Code: EMER2
Type: PIC16F628 + 24LC64
Gross Weight: 5g
Price:

10+: each.
50+: each.
100+: each.

<EMER4F>
<EMER4B>

Ordering Code: EMER4
Type: PIC16F628 + 24LC256
Gross Weight: 5g
Price:

10+: each.
50+: each.
100+: each.

Should you desire one or more boxes of 200 EMER2 or EMER4 cards then please ask for my latest trade price.

PIC16F877 + 24LC64 Silver Wafer

PIC16F877
   Program Area: 14336 bytes, 8192x14 words
   Data Ram: 368 bytes
   Data EEPROM: 256 bytes
   Max Freq: 20 Mhz
   A/D Converters (10-bits): 8
   I/O Ports: 33
   In-Circuit Serial Programming (ICSP) via 2 pins
   Power-on Reset (POR)
   Power-up Timer (PWRT)
   Brown-out Reset (BOR)
   Watchdog Timer (WDT)
   Two 8-bit Timers, and One 16-bit Timer.
   Oscillator Start-up Timer (OST)
   Programmable Code Protection.
   Power saving SLEEP mode.
   Selectable Oscillator options.

24LC64
   8192 bytes storage, I2C bus.

Click Here to see the complete specification for the PIC16F877.

This Silver coloured wafer card is quite a special one when it has firmware code space equal to eight times that of the common Gold card. Since this is even four times that of my high memory PIC16F628 + 24LC64 based card then this card is certainly not short of space and could even be considered an overkill.

As long you remember that firmware for other card types cannot work in this card then you should not have a problem when PIC16F876 and PIC16F877 based firmware can.

And for note the only real difference between these two microcontrollers is that the PIC16F877 has extra I/O pins. These extra pins are zero use on a wafer when they are unconnected anyway but as the PIC16F876 microcontroller does not come in wafer card format then that is why the PIC16F877 is always used.

This explains the problem with the above diagram when how possibly can a device with 33 I/O pins fit on a device shown with only 28 pins? This is because the 28-pin device shown in the diagram is actually the PIC16F876 and not the 40-pin PIC16F877 when after all why make the diagram more complex with a 40-pin device when the extra not displayed I/O pins are unused anyway?

The wafer card quality is excellent and testing has shown no thermal problems. This will be pleasing to customers wishing to use these cards for digital applications when general equipment heat has been known to bend some cheap wafer cards. Also finding a faulty card should be most unlikely when all cards have been factory tested for faults before dispatch.

Programming this wafer card type is very easy. I would recommend using my ELVIS or GMPC+ programmer for this task but then there are hundreds of other card programmers around that support this common card type as well. Naturally this wafer card, like all other cards that I sell, is a "flash" type. This means that you can reprogram it again and again with different firmware as desired.

Wafer cards built to this design are commonly called the Silver card which explains my following ordering code.

<SILVERF>
<SILVERB>

Ordering Code: SILVER
Type: PIC16F877 + 24LC64
Gross Weight: 5g
Price:

10+: each.
50+: each.
100+: each.

Should you desire one or more boxes of 200 SILVER cards then please ask for my latest trade price.

AT90S8515A + 24LC64 (or 24LC256, 25LC512, 24LC1024) FunCard Wafer

AT90S8515A
   Program Area: 8192 bytes, 4096x16 words
   SRam: 512 bytes
   Data EEPROM: 512 bytes
   Max Freq: 8 Mhz
   I/O Ports: 32
   One 8-bit Timer, and One 16-bit Timer.
   Programmable Watchdog Timer.
   Low-Power Idle and Power-Down Modes.
   Programmable Serial UART
   Master/Slave Serial Interface
   External & Internal Interrupt Sources
   On-Chip Analog Comparator
   Programmable Code Protection.

FUN2: 24LC64 8192 bytes storage.
FUN4: 24LC256 32768 bytes storage.
FUN5: 24LC512 65536 bytes storage.
FUN6: 24LC1024 131072 bytes storage.

Click Here to see the complete specification for the AT90S8515A.

This selection of four different types of wafer card I decided to handle within this one section when after all these cards only come with different sizes of data storage in their EEPROMs. What this means is that these cards have the same functionality but with each increase in size of EEPROM comes the ability to store greater amounts of data.

So to answer the most common question first then just what one of these FUN2, FUN4, FUN5 and FUN6 cards do you need? Well the answer to that depends on how much data you need to store (like with photos) or the card type required by the firmware that you intend to use. It is worth noting though that public firmware has been made to support all FunCard types for the required minimum size and above. An example of this is that the FUN4 card can be used with firmware made for FUN2, FUN3 and FUN4 cards where the extra EEPROM space is just left unused. Equally the FUN6 card can use firmware made for the FUN2, FUN3, FUN4, FUN5 and FUN6 cards.

These cards must be the odd ones out on this cards page up to this point when they are based on Atmel instead of PIC Microcontrollers.

The reason I am a PIC supporter is that why on earth would you possibly need anything else? Such as the high capacity of my PIC based SILVER card cannot possibly leave room for a rival where that card is very easy is to program and has good support. Is it not funny then when right here are the very rival cards of similar capacity which must make you think "why?"

The answer that question is mostly because cards like my Silver card are quite new when those cards only became possible when Microchip made these higher capacity flash microcontrollers. So before this time there was a gap when the current Gold king has for a long time been a little short on space. And since Atmel made some nice high capacity microcontrollers before this then so did some wise spark get the idea to combine the AT90S8515A and 24LC64 on to a PCB card. Those that know their card history will know that this PCB monster was then named the FunCard.

Now after a lot of further development making this card popular then other wise people then saw that making a wafer version was also possible. And as they also saw that there was money to be made doing so then so was the FunCard (FUN2) wafer card born. Later on as people had a desire for even more data storage then so were the following FunCards of the FUN4, FUN5 and FUN6 cards born. In case you are wondering then there is also a FUN3 FunCard but as the FUN4 FunCard quickly became more popular then so it is not worth supporting a higher cost and lower capacity card.

Anyway this explains just why there is currently a rival to the Silver card. As the FunCard got a large head start by being made in PCB format first then at this time the FunCard has the support advantage.

Those people who are also common PIC users will find the world of Atmel programming a little strange at first. An example of this is that with a PIC based card like the Silver card you need two firmware files to load into the card, where naturally one is for the PIC16F877 and the other is for the 24LC64. However, with these Atmel based card you often need three firmware files, where I can assure you that one of them is not a loader file.

These three files are divided into the AT90S8515A "Flash" file, the 24LCxxxx "EEPROM" file, and the extra third file is to be programmed into the Internal EEPROM space on the AT90S8515A.

It is interesting to note that the PIC16F877 also has in Internal EEPROM region but the data to go in this region is stored in the normal PIC file. This means that on the PIC16F877 the Flash and Internal EEPROM region is programmed in one go, while on the AT90S8515A it is not.

Hardly a problem as long as you can remember what file is which where naming them Flash, Internal EEPROM, and External EEPROM would solve that problem easily enough. Still, as in some cases there is no need for an Internal EEPROM file, then there is no need to worry if your firmware for these FunCards only has two files.

You next have to wonder why these Atmel based cards often has a third file instead of using the PIC method but there is two clues why that is.

First reason is that you can get the exact same Microcontroller (under a different model naturally) that has everything except the Internal EEPROM region. And so as this region is an addition then that could explain why they choose to use a separate file. The second reason you will soon notice when you first program a FunCard, when programming the flash region sure is slow compared to the PIC type. This is not really a problem, when who cannot wait a couple of minutes, but it is another clue.

And as I previous clocked Gold card programming using my ELVIS programmer at 26 seconds then you could be interested to know that my Silver card test came in at 100 seconds. And finally the FUN2 FunCard programming (with the slow flash) came in at 201 seconds, where of course the FUN4, FUN5 and FUN6 types of FunCard will take slightly longer each time due to their larger EEPROMs. Still, as programming the Atmel Microcontroller is the slow part, then even the large 24LC1024 EEPROM should not add on that much extra time.

Naturally a higher capacity card takes longer to program which is why the low capacity Gold card is so quick to program. However if you compare the capacity of the Silver and FUN2 cards then you will see that Atmel programming takes over twice as long as PIC programming.

As to card quality then like with the Silver card it is excellent and should suffer no thermal problems when used with digital applications. Also as all cards are factory tested then finding a faulty card would be most unlikely.

In the end what is important is what you need it for when that aspect is all up to you and determines the card type you need. Also before I get to the prices then would recommend using my ELVIS programmer to program all these Atmel based card types.

<FUN2F>
<FUN2B>

Ordering Code: FUN2
Type: Funcard 2 (AT90S8515A + 24LC64)
Gross Weight: 5g
Price:

10+: each.
50+: each.

<FUN4F>
<FUN4B>

Ordering Code: FUN4
Type: Funcard 4 (AT90S8515A + 24LC256)
Gross Weight: 5g
Price:

10+: each.
50+: each.

<FUN5F>
<FUN5B>

Ordering Code: FUN5
Type: Funcard 5 (AT90S8515A + 24LC512)
Gross Weight: 5g
Price:

10+: each.

<FUN6F>
<FUN6B>

Ordering Code: FUN6
Type: Funcard 6 (AT90S8515A + 24LC1024)
Gross Weight: 5g
Price:

10+: each.

Please see the next section for the FUN7 card.

Should you desire one or more boxes of 200 FUN2, FUN4, FUN5 or FUN6 cards then please ask for my latest trade price.

AT90S8515A + 2 x 24LC1024 FunCard Wafer

AT90S8515A
   Program Area: 8192 bytes, 4096x16 words
   SRam: 512 bytes
   Data EEPROM: 512 bytes
   Max Freq: 8 Mhz
   I/O Ports: 32
   One 8-bit Timer, and One 16-bit Timer.
   Programmable Watchdog Timer.
   Low-Power Idle and Power-Down Modes.
   Programmable Serial UART
   Master/Slave Serial Interface
   External & Internal Interrupt Sources
   On-Chip Analog Comparator
   Programmable Code Protection.

24LC1024 131072 bytes storage.
24LC1024 131072 bytes storage.

Click Here to see the complete specification for the AT90S8515A.

This FUN7 card I simply had to put into an entirely new section from the other FunCards when this card is no simple case of pull out one EEPROM size and stick in another. Not that you can do this hot swapping on wafer card mind you but you should know what I mean from the above FunCards.

The reason why this card is different from the other FunCards is that to move from the FUN6 to the FUN7 card you would expect to upgrade the 24LC1024 EEPROM to the 24LC2048 EEPROM. Bingo! Your new FUN7 card is born when you can slot it in with all the other cards while you get busy on the 24LC4096 EEPROM for the FUN8 card.

Unfortunately the flaw with this ever doubling the EEPR0M size is that there is no 24LC2048 EEPROM. Damn! Now there will be no FUN7 card you may think. Then again if you look closely at the above technical details you will see that the AT90S8515A has a small surprise in store.

This surprise I can now reveal is that this FUN7 card comes with two whole 24LC1024 EEPROMs wired in. That is all of 262,144 bytes of combined storage, or 256 KB should you wish to round up to something more common. Modern flash devices can certainly do better but this is a damned lot of storage for the tiny size that a wafer card has available.

If you remember the former PCB based Quadra cards then this FunCard seems very much like the FunQuadraCard. Packing all this equipment into such a tiny space explains why this FUN7 card will always cost quite a lot more than the other FunCards.

Anyway should you need a huge amount of data storage on a wafer card then there is unlikely to ever be a card on this very cards page that can hold as much. There will never be a FUN8 card either now that all the suitable pins on this microcontroller have been used to support the largest sized EEPROMs.

One thing I should add is that some people like to ask me how these FUN6 and FUN7 cards can have 24LC1024 EEPROMs when Microchip does not yet make a 24LC1024 EEPROM? The 24LC1024 happens to be a Microchip model code where Microchip only do the 24LC512.

The answer to this question is that every card on this Card's page will actually contain a slightly different EEPROM model to that stated where all smartcard suppliers like myself stick to a standard EEPROM format, namely 24x1024, 24C1024 or 24LC1024, to indicate compatibility with other cards on the market. In this more extreme example FunCards are actually made using Atmel EEPROMs for compatibility reasons. Atmel microcontroller matched to an Atmel EEPROM.

So there is your answer to why I and other supplier's mention the 24LC1024. You can also begin to see why some problem Funcards have been known to hit the market with a microcontroller and EEPROM timing issue, only from other suppliers I should state, due to manufacturer's making use of real Microchip EEPROMs due to cost savings.

You can also be certain that all the common FunCard supporting programmers around will support this FUN7 card. I should also mention that you should be able to use all the common FunCard firmware in this card when such firmware will simply ignore the second EEPROM.

This is a great card for your most data storage demanding firmware. Here now are my prices...

<FUN7F>
<FUN7B>

Ordering Code: FUN7
Type: Funcard 7 (AT90S8515A + 2 x 24LC1024)
Gross Weight: 5g
Price:

10+: each.

Should you desire one or more boxes of 200 FUN7 cards then please ask for my latest trade price.

ATMega163 + 24LC256 Wafer

ATMEGA163
   Program Area: 16384 bytes
   SRam: 1024 bytes
   Data EEPROM: 512 bytes
   Max Freq: 8 Mhz
   I/O Ports: 32
   Two 8-bit Timers, and One 16-bit Timer.
   Programmable Watchdog Timer.
   Power-on Reset & Brown-out Detection.
   Four Sleep Modes: Idle, ADC Noise reduction, Power-save & Power-down.
   Programmable Serial UART
   Master/Slave SPI Serial Interface
   External & Internal Interrupt Sources
   Analog Comparator
   Programmable Code Protection.

24LC256
   32768 bytes storage, I2C bus.

Click Here to see the complete specification for the ATMEGA163.

In case you were wondering what card follows the complete range of FunCards (see above) then the answer to that question is this very ATMega card.

The reason why this is the big brother of the FunCard is rather a simple one when the ATMega163 microcontroller has exactly double the program space compared to the complete range of AT90S8515A based FunCards. So that means that the firmware code programmed into this card can be twice as large, where as this ATMega163 microcontroller is of course a 'flash' type, then so can you completely reprogram this card 1000 times on average.

Due to this card using the 24LC256 EEPROM then this card is most like the FUN4 card. Still, if you wanted to double both the microcontroller and EEPROM sizes, then you could sum up this card just by saying that it has twice the capacity of the FUN3 card.

However if we examine this card more closely then so can we spot a few other changes.

Instead of wasting time on things like having two 8-bit timers instead of one then the most interesting part is Atmel's claim that you do not need a card programmer to program this card. That is certainly true enough for their whole ATMega range of microcontrollers when instead of using a card programmer you can instead use a "card interface".

What this means is that you can use my SMART3 model, or any other Phoenix programmer, to program this card instead using its ISO7816 communication programming method. You just need suitable PC software from Atmel or ATMEGA flashing software from the Net. You can say that this card type comes with its own bootloader firmware built in.

Still if you do not desire to use this card interface method then so can programmers like my ELVIS model program this card type easily enough.

I know that using this card type is more popular with people in North America, but since like all my cards it is not application specific, then so am I aware of a few uses here in Europe as well. That I guess is why my very first sale was to a customer in the UK. Anyway, it is a very nice high quality card, where those people who love their Atmel microcontroller based smart cards will be overjoyed with this one.

<ATMEGAF>
<ATMEGAB>

Ordering Code: ATMEGA
Gross Weight: 5g
Price:

10+: each.

Should you desire one or more boxes of 200 ATMEGA cards then please ask for my latest trade price.

AT90SC3232C Titanium Wafer

AT90SC3232C
   Flash: 32768 bytes
   RAM: 3072 bytes
   Data EEPROM: 32768 bytes (1,000,000 write cycles typical, 10 year data retention)
       including 128 bytes OTP & 384 byte addressing.
   Protocols: T0, T1 (up to 625 kbs at 5 MHz)
   Max Freq: 16 Mhz. (Programmable Internal Oscillator)
   Two 16-bit Timers.
   Random Number Generator (RNG).
   I/O Ports: 2 (configurable)
   Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) Controller.
   Interrupt Controller: 2 level, 8 vector.
   Checksum Accelerator.
   CRC 16 Engine (ISO/IEC 3309).
   8-bit GF(2n) Multiplier).
   Low Power Idle & Power Down Modes
   Operating Range: 2.7v to 5.5v.
   Crypto: Yes (RSA).
   Crypto Coprocessor: RSA, DSA, Key Generation, ECC.
   Physical Attack Protection:
      Voltage Monitor.
      Frequency Monitor.
      Temperature Monitor.
      Protection against SPA/DPA attacks.
      Supervisor Mode.
   Hardware DES & Triple-DES DPA Resistant
   ESD Protection to ~6000v.

Click Here to see the complete specification for the AT90SC3232C.

The first thing to know about these Titanium 1 cards are that they are second-user and not new cards. The reason for this unusual exception on this cards page is because new factory production is no longer possible when Atmel no longer make the AT90SC3232C in wafer card format. This little fact helps to explain why later smartcards moved to the AT90SC6464C but since I sometimes get asked by customers for these original Titanium smartcards then well here they are.

Each card I obtain is tested to confirm that it works, and to ensure that it is in an acceptable condition, but beyond that usage marks will be common. I should also add that I always update each card to the latest OS v1.06 in the process, no matter what OS the card comes with, which will ensure compatibility with all public firmware. The OS can be downgraded to an earlier version if required using a Phoenix 3.58MHz model.

Titanium cards even when they were in production had a colourful history of supply problems. The original manufacturer was denied new AT90SC3232C supply due to questionable market use, an a all white clone card was then made, and in all market supply problems were common before the AT90SC3232C kicked the bucket. I can only hope for no further supply problems in my quest to redistribute former Titanium cards to new users but these days they are unlikely to be that popular.

The most important thing about these Titanium cards is that they were the very first of the third generation of smart cards that began to tackle these much stronger encryption systems being used. So just like all following third generation smart cards then the microcontroller on this very card has RSA encryption/decryption built in. So at the start it was the only public smart card available that could handle this RSA encryption.

So when the AT90SC3232C was no more then following third generation cards soon moved to the AT90SC6464C starting with the M2 card. Beyond the history of these cards then if you seek a smartcard with RSA encryption/decryption routines hard wired into the AT90SC3232C then here is the only card around.

As that is all I can think to say about this item, then if you fancy playing about with the original Titanium card and optional public firmware, then here you go.

<TIT1F>
<TIT1B>

Ordering Code: TIT1
Gross Weight: 5g
Price:

5+: each.

AT90SC6464C Platinuim or M2 Wafer

AT90SC6464C
   Flash: 65536 bytes (10,000 write cycles minimum, 10 year data retention)
   RAM: 3072 bytes
   Data EEPROM: 65536 bytes (500,000 write cycles typical, 10 year data retention)
       including 64 bytes OTP & 64 byte addressing.
   Max Freq: 16 Mhz.
   Two 16-bit Timers.
   Random Number Generator (RNG).
   I/O Ports: 2 (configurable, including IS07816-3)
   Interrupt Controller: 2 level, 8 vector.
   Checksum Accelerator.
   Low Power Idle & Power Down Modes.
   Operating Range: 2.7v to 3.3v and 4.5 to 5.5v.
   Crypto: Yes (RSA).
   Crypto Coprocessor: RSA, DSA, Key Generation, ECC.
   Physical Attack Protection:
      Voltage Monitor.
      Frequency Monitor.
      Environmental Protection System.
      Protection against SPA/DPA attacks.
      Supervisor Mode.
   Hardware DES & Triple-DES DPA Resistant.
   ESD Protection to ~6000v.

Click Here to see the complete specification for the AT90SC6464C.

I should first point out that this card type was first produced as the M2 (or M-II) card where later on this card was also released under the Platinum card name. This was either done to simply give it a better and easier to find name, or this is one of those cases of competition between different smartcard manufacturers.

Since this card was first released as the M2 card then that explains why from now on this is the only name that I will use. This will help to stop any other ideas of multiple release names for the one card. I should also point out that since they are exactly the same card type, no matter the external colour, then so will firmware under either name work on this card.

The exact type I will stock will depend on the price, quality and availability. As this should make no difference at all, unless you wished to hang this smartcard on your wall, then I would see no need why people should need to enquire. You can still enquire if you really want to though.

The most important thing about this M2 card is that it was the very first hobby market card to make use of the AT90SC6464C following the demise of the Titanium 1 card's AT90SC3232C. The second most interesting thing about these first cards is that the OTP area was not stamped with the M2 card mark allowing people to instead stamp this once write memory area with the mark for the later cards also making use of the AT90SC6464C. As this little fact harmed profit for the later AT90SC6464C based cards then this explains why the very latest cards moved away from using the AT90SC6464C.

Since the M2 card has also been subject to market supply problems then this helps to explain why I began supplying this card type only once the supply problems were no more. Supplying this card late would have greatly reduced my M2 card sales but as I never like market supply problems anyway then little loss. Fortunately, this card type now being released under multiple names means that there is now no single source to dry up. That could well make it the most available third generation card.

So should you be in need of an RSA supporting smartcard to the M2 specification then so I am sure that you would you have to look long and hard to find a high quality third generation card for this good price.

<M2F>
<M2B>

Ordering Code: M2
Gross Weight: 5g
Price:

5+: each.

Trade enquiries on this card type are welcome.

AT90SC6464C Knot Wafer

AT90SC6464C
   Flash: 65536 bytes (10,000 write cycles minimum, 10 year data retention)
   RAM: 3072 bytes
   Data EEPROM: 65536 bytes (500,000 write cycles typical, 10 year data retention)
       including 64 bytes OTP & 64 byte addressing.
   Max Freq: 16 Mhz.
   Two 16-bit Timers.
   Random Number Generator (RNG).
   I/O Ports: 2 (configurable, including IS07816-3)
   Interrupt Controller: 2 level, 8 vector.
   Checksum Accelerator.
   Low Power Idle & Power Down Modes.
   Operating Range: 2.7v to 3.3v and 4.5 to 5.5v.
   Crypto: Yes (RSA).
   Crypto Coprocessor: RSA, DSA, Key Generation, ECC.
   Physical Attack Protection:
      Voltage Monitor.
      Frequency Monitor.
      Environmental Protection System.
      Protection against SPA/DPA attacks.
      Supervisor Mode.
   Hardware DES & Triple-DES DPA Resistant.
   ESD Protection to ~6000v.

Click Here to see the complete specification for the AT90SC6464C.

This Knot wafer card is just one of many third generation card types that make use of the ever popular AT90SC6464C microcontroller with its built-in RSA encryption/decryption support. So the only difference between this Knot card and other cards making use of the AT90SC6464C, beyond the pretty external colouring, is that this Knot card will have the OTP memory area pre-stamped with the Knot card code.

This Knot OTP code is only important when making use of public Knot card firmware and PC software which will expect to see this code or will refuse to work. For everyone else then as long as you do not need to use those 64 bytes of One Time Programmable (OTP) memory then this card is fine to use. Should you need to use the 64 byte OTP area then the above M2 card should be your choice.

The only other interesting thing to say about this Knot card is that if you wish to know the least popular card type I have ever sold then here it is. It was in fact so unpopular then I have already discontinued this Knot card once, but since I can now buy these cards at an excellent low price, then being the lowest priced third generation smartcard on this very page can also be seen to be a bargain.

The only reason why this Knot card has never been that popular is simply because this card type has lacked popular public firmware where popular public firmware makes for popular card sales. These days it always puzzles me why firmware is not made to work on all AT90SC6464C cards, as could easily be done by those with the knowledge, when then sales of lower priced third generation cards would prove a lot more popular.

Should that day never come about then right here will stand some nice site decoration with only the very rare sale for some mystery customer use. I of course hope and expect for more but the one thing that it true to say is that a bargain priced third generation card will always have a welcomed home here.

In the end this is a very well designed third generation card at an excellent price.

<KNOTF>
<KNOTB>

Ordering Code: KNOT
Gross Weight: 5g
Price:

5+: each.

Trade enquiries on this card type are welcome.

AT90SC6464C Titanium 2 Wafer

AT90SC6464C
   Flash: 65536 bytes (10,000 write cycles minimum, 10 year data retention)
   RAM: 3072 bytes
   Data EEPROM: 65536 bytes (500,000 write cycles typical, 10 year data retention)
       including 64 bytes OTP & 64 byte addressing.
   Max Freq: 16 Mhz.
   Two 16-bit Timers.
   Random Number Generator (RNG).
   I/O Ports: 2 (configurable, including IS07816-3)
   Interrupt Controller: 2 level, 8 vector.
   Checksum Accelerator.
   Low Power Idle & Power Down Modes.
   Operating Range: 2.7v to 3.3v and 4.5 to 5.5v.
   Crypto: Yes (RSA).
   Crypto Coprocessor: RSA, DSA, Key Generation, ECC.
   Physical Attack Protection:
      Voltage Monitor.
      Frequency Monitor.
      Environmental Protection System.
      Protection against SPA/DPA attacks.
      Supervisor Mode.
   Hardware DES & Triple-DES DPA Resistant.
   ESD Protection to ~6000v.

Click Here to see the complete specification for the AT90SC6464C.

This Titanium 2 card was obviously made to try and tap into the popularity of the former Titanium 1 card. This little act of confusion also now has to make me point out that Titanium 1 firmware will only work in Titanium 1 cards and Titanium 2 firmware only in Titanium 2 cards. Try this firmware use the other way around and you will quickly discover one major difference between the AT90SC3232C (TIT1) and the AT90SC6464C (TIT2). Namely... it won't work.

Moving on to discuss this Titanium 2 card alone then this was clearly yet another third generation card to make use of the RSA encryption/decryption routines hard coded into the ever popular AT90SC6464C microcontroller. Like other third generation cards the OTP memory area on the AT90SC6464C has been pre-wrote with the Titanium 2 code meaning that only Titanium 2 firmware will run on this card.

This card without question must win the most cool feature ever added to a wafer card award beyond the original concept to actually add colour to one's plastic that is. What I mean is that the number 2 clearly seen on the front of this card will (as if by magic...) completely disappear when exposed to heat. Testing this out in one's family oven is obviously not the right way to handle a smartcard which makes me add that the common heat from a CAM, or even holding it under your thumb, is plenty good enough. Bye bye number 2 only to see it quickly return when the card cools down.

Beyond such strangeness then if you seek a third generation card under the Titanium 2 name then here is the very card you seek.

<TIT2F>
<TIT2B>

Ordering Code: TIT2
Gross Weight: 5g
Price:

5+: each.

Trade enquiries on this card type are welcome.

Click here for how to place an order